Attitudes Towards healthy Eating Study Finds Healthy Eating Is Important to Canadians

Around the world, attitudes are changing towards healthy living and eating and according to a recent study by Mintel so is that of Canadians. It is the rise of holistic health trends, and superfoods and Canadians are taking a whole new approach towards health according to the study called Attitudes Towards Healthy Eating.

Mintel’s study found that as much as 84% of consumers in Canada believe that what they consume hugely impacts their physical health. Around 63% or almost two-thirds of Canadians agree that their emotional wellbeing is affected by their eating pattern. The study on healthy eating also showed that around of 72% of all mean is trying to eat more healthy foods while 80% of women are focussed on consuming more healthy foods.

The association of food with a label of good or bad could make certain individual feel bad or good, which potentially affects woman’s self-esteem. The is again proved by the recent study that found that almost half, or more accurately 49% of all Canadians shared that they do feel guilty after eating foods considered to be less healthy. This percentage reaches 59% amongst women younger than 55 years of age and further increases to 60% amongst mothers. Overall around 45% of all Canadians showed interest in trying out the latest foods claim to increase health, which includes spirulina and chia seeds. Around 35% is already including super-foods in their diet by adding broccoli, kale and quinoa to most meals.

To proof, the increase in the importance of healthy eating, around 40% agreed that they are conducting online research in order to learn more about foods that address specific needs such as controlling acid reflux and improving skin conditions. Yet still, only 27% or a mere one quarter revealed that they are more likely to purchase items that claim to be healthy on packaging since similar food without a health claim cost less. The Mintel study found in fact only about 20% of all consumers did trust the health claims made on the packaging of food. For consumers aged 10 to 34 years of age, the barrier of adopting a healthier lifestyle as well as healthier eating is more challenging. For the younger age the high frequency of events, social outings and always being on the go offers an increase in opportunity to snack.

Summary

The Mintel study proofed a definite increase in the importance of healthy eating, which is further confirmed by almost 50% of Canadians feeling guilty after consuming foods or snacks they feel is unhealthy. This can change tremendously once younger residents in Canada get more interested as they would be able to teach youngsters from an early age about eating healthy and within a few years, the whole world could benefit from healthy lifestyle decisions we all make today.